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Home Forums Bikes Suzuki DR650 Exhaust Headache

This topic contains 22 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  ss2fly 1 year, 6 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • #13298

    Adrian
    Participant
    • Location: Cambridge
    • Bike: 2012 DR650
    • Rank: 250cc Rider

    Pictures to come later, but for now I’ll share my ongoing experience so the rest of you can learn from it, or even better, learn me on it as things are not going well..

    So, a few weekends ago, I decided I would make a day project of polishing up the dr650 exhaust, it is stainless steel after all..

    In the process of removing the exhaust header bolts, one of them held a referendum, and the head voted to leave the shaft of the bolt stuck in the top end of the engine. Now I have about 1 thread of the bolt left sticking out from the engine head..

    I see now, my quick weekend project probably isn’t quick anymore. Well, that happened about a month ago..

    I took a break, did some research and decided i would try the EZ-OUT approach. to stay on the safe-side, I ordered a range of left-hand drill bits. I center-punched the shaft of the bolt and, slowly drilled out the centre of the bolt.

    This went well, and I was quite pleased that the hole I had drilled was relatively concentric within the bolt. I managed to break off the 4mm bit as it broke through the end of the bolt, but that came out relatively easily (I even made a custom tool to grab and unscrew it, if anyone needs a custom 4mm-broken drill-bit screwdriver.. let me know), so no drama there.

    Now the EZ-OUTS, Lesson 1: Do not use the ez-outs you can buy from Bunnings or Mitre 10, like don’t even have them sitting in your workshop. They were way too soft and couldn’t even get the slightest purchase in the bolt. I can only imagine there is an alternate universe where these actually serve a purpose.
    After getting nowhere with a cheap one, I went to tradetools and purchased a fancy proper one, I also picked up a can of CRC penetr8 Freezing spray.

    Over the next week I proceeded to coat the bolt with CRC, WD-40 and try and thermally shock it with the penetr8 spray.

    After emptying all three cans, I decided to have a crack with the EZ-OUT. Standard procedure there, tapped it in a little with the hammer and proceeded to put pressure on it with the tap-wrench.

    Of-course the EZ-OUT would break off inside the bolt.

    Now I have soft aluminium engine head -> steel-bolt -> Broken-off EZ-OUT Stud.

    More to come..

    #13299

    Brainflex
    Participant
    • Location: Whakatane, Bay of Plenty
    • Bike: CT110, Husky TE 250, DRZ250, CB500X
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Well bugger! Time to talk to your local friendly motorbike shop.

    #13300

    Adrian
    Participant
    • Location: Cambridge
    • Bike: 2012 DR650
    • Rank: 250cc Rider

    Yeah, at that point I probably should’ve. But Instead I still chose not to give up.

    The way the EZ-OUT had broken had left some chunks of metal, so I tried using a punch to see if the impact could get some movement out of the bolt. Nothing.All i managed was to shatter the ez-out down to nothing more than a stub on the end of the shaft of the bolt.

    So I did more research, this time on how to remove an EZ-OUT. I couldn’t find anything. I tried drilling into it (Hint: HSS won’t drill that stuff). However in my research I did find a technique for drilling into hardened steel: Use a masonry bit, the bit won’t drill, but kind of shatters the EZ-out, so I tried that, and sure-enough it worked!

    So a few hours of drilling (for real, I had to do it over a couple of days), yet more crc and about 4 masonry bits later, the Ez-out was drilled out!

    So, now I’m back where I started (not really, but now there’s only one unwanted piece of metal to worry about..).

    This is as far as I’ve gotten with this, I started drlling the shaft of the bolt out with a 5.5mm bit, but the hole is a little more messed up now, and if I do this one by eye, I risk drilling the bits I don’t want to remove. So now I concede defeat, I’m thinking that instead of taking it to a bike shop, I just take the head off and find a machine shop that specialises in engine work/ reconditioning.

    #13301

    Adrian
    Participant
    • Location: Cambridge
    • Bike: 2012 DR650
    • Rank: 250cc Rider

    So, Lessons for anyone else from what i’ve gone through:
    1, throw away those cheap ez-outs.
    2, before you even attempt those bolts: get crc/wd-40/whatever else in there.
    3, those bunnings/ mitre 10 propane torches can’t really heat up the bolt, on a part of the bike that’s supposed to take heat away.
    4, masonry bits can drill hardened steel.
    5, the hole for the bolt in question actually comes out near the spark plugs*, use it to get crc in behind the thread. ( If I had have known this sooner, things might have gone much smoother).
    * actually, now that I think about it, that hole is probably the cause of the corrosion that has caused all this in the first place?

    I reckon that the ez-out would’ve had a better chance if I did a bit more thermal cycling before hand.

    I’ll get some pictures up when I can, I’ll also update on my progress with the repair when I have news.
    But hey at least the exhaust has a mirror finish on it.. it looks really good hanging up on my bedroom wall.

    #13303

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location: Hamilton
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Oh bugger.

    When you find a good engineer let us know. I’ve got a DRZ125 that had a helicoil style insert put into the spark plug thread by an previous owner. When I tried to remove the spark plug recently the insert pulled partly out also.

    #13351

    Adrian
    Participant
    • Location: Cambridge
    • Bike: 2012 DR650
    • Rank: 250cc Rider

    Ok, Update time,

    I finally got the head off. That was a saga in itself.

    There are two 12mm nuts that bolt the head to the cylinder. one under the exhaust and one under the intake ports. Sure enough, I rounded off the nut under the intake port (don’t laugh, you’ll find out later)

    I instead removed the head and cylinder as one unit. This meant I has full access to what was left of the nut. If you look, you’ll see there’s no space for a socket here. I went with the chisel technique: cut a groove in the nut and lightly tap the chisel to get it to rotate off.

    AT least that’s the theory. What happens to mine? well the nut would rather get metal shaved off it 1mm at a time than rotate off. Eventually I used the dremel to grind away part of the nut to get solid purchase which allowed me to tap it off. The thread underneath was fine, but apparently the Suzuki factory uses cheese-grade hardware and replaces JB-Weld for loctite..

    Now that I have the head off, It turns out that the exhaust ports also leak a little, so I’ll ask about that when I take it into a shop.

    Attachments:
    #13353

    Adrian
    Participant
    • Location: Cambridge
    • Bike: 2012 DR650
    • Rank: 250cc Rider

    Also, It turns out it is possible to drill out an EZ-Out: Here is my proof:
    And this is the type of bit you want: http://www.bosch-pt.com/gb/en/accocs/Accessories/207730/cyl-9-multi-construction-multi-purpose-drill-bits/

    *use the hand-drill on hammer setting, I think proper masonry drill would be too violent.*

    Attachments:
    #13363

    Adrian
    Participant
    • Location: Cambridge
    • Bike: 2012 DR650
    • Rank: 250cc Rider

    Well, I dropped off the head this morning at Hamilton Cylinder Head & Engine Reconditioners in Frankton.

    I also picked up some replacement flange nuts to replace the factory ones. so I may have a few leftover for whoever next decides to do something similar.

    #13365

    Black Betty
    Participant
    • Location: Papamoa
    • Bike: DR650
    • Rank: 800cc Rider

    Crikey!
    After reading this debacle with your exhaust header bolts, I thought I’d tempt fate and try removed mine.
    Luckily they came out without any drama. I replaced them with 316 stainless.
    Good luck getting the old girl running again!

    #13366

    2bobrob
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike: Dr650
    • Rank: 80cc Rider

    Hi

    I’m an fitter turner 30 years of engineering, ezy outs are the worst invention ever if a bolt is ceased in place they will break ever time then you can’t drill it out,

    To get out a broken bolt just drill it and retap

    Also stainless steel is soft and is easy to break, just use anti cease

    #13367

    Black Betty
    Participant
    • Location: Papamoa
    • Bike: DR650
    • Rank: 800cc Rider

    I would have thought something like anti-seize pointless as it would just burn off in a matter of minutes. Guess stainless will be easier to drill out should it ever break 😉

    #13376

    Adrian
    Participant
    • Location: Cambridge
    • Bike: 2012 DR650
    • Rank: 250cc Rider

    Yeah, I would almost recommend bolt replacement to be up there in the list of standard mods for the DR. (I also had a seized nut in another part of the engine, I practically had to grind the nut off.)

    bobrob – Yeah, considering the amount of force required to break the cap screw in the first place, the ez-out didn’t stand a chance. But I guess now i know first-hand..

    I’ll get the anti-seize in there, according to the website, it’s good up to 982 degrees c, so I think it’s probably good. http://www.crc.co.nz/Copper-AntiSeize–Lubricating-Compound/6895-327a003a-3ee2-4980-97d7-7b6e816ae339/

    #13377

    Adrian
    Participant
    • Location: Cambridge
    • Bike: 2012 DR650
    • Rank: 250cc Rider

    Ok, here was another headache:
    This is a 12mm, m6 flange nut that bolts the head to the cylinder on the intake side. It would rather be carved away by a chisel than loosen off..

    Attachments:
    #14039

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location: Hamilton
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    @adrianmc0609 How’s it progressing?

    #14083

    Daniel Flynn
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike:
    • Rank: 50cc Rider

    Nickel anti sieze might be a better option, Has a higher temperature rating and is better if you are using stainless bolts. We use it on foundry and furnace parts at work

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