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Home Forums General Discussion Gear Fitting your own tyres tips

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #31706

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location:
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Do you change your own tyres? What tips have you got for others.

    It’s skill that could come in handy if you ever have a puncture out on the trail and something every adventure rider who gets off the beaten track should have some familiarity with.

    I’ll start with the yellow and red dots painted onto a tyre.

    The yellow dot is the lightest part of the tyre and so should be mounted at the heaviest part of the rim. This one isn’t easy to figure out as without a machine there’s not really any way of telling which part of the rim is heaviest.

    The red dot is the heaviest part of the tyre and should be directly opposite the valve. This is to minimise the amount of balancing weights needed on the wheel overall.

    Soapy water makes the job much easier.

    #4542

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location:
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Having 5 bikes in the house between my DR (with 2 front rims), BMW R80 sidecar and Ducati 250 project, Jennifer’s DR250, the youngest’s DS80 and the son’s GN250 we regularly need tyres changing, and at $40 a pop at the shop the yearly cost adds up.

    Doing them manually using tyre levers sucks so I was looking at manual tyre changers like these on TradeMe at $275, but they only do up to 16.5″ tyres, which seems a bit useless.

    http://www.trademe.co.nz/business-farming-industry/farming-forestry/other/auction-778034870.htm

    Here’s a video of a manual tyre changer in action.

    Does anyone know of anything out there in NZ that would suit 21′ tyres?

    #4554

    Gavin Gray
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike: R80GS Basic, KTM 990 Adventure, ZReX!!
    • Rank: 50cc Rider

    http://www.motozone.co.nz/products/tools/tyre-wheel-tools/tyre-changers/

    No-Mar changers are pricey but all the reviews seem positive.Not sure I could justify one myself.

    #4556

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location:
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Yeah that’s a bit rich for my wallet.

    #31710

    Daniel Fisher
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike: DRZ250 DRZ400E
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    I have changed my tube type tyres for a few years now and it used to be a real chore, still not something I look forward to, but practice definitely makes this job easier.

    As Eddie states some kind of lubricant helps to no end. I use a tyre paste, also a concentrated mix of dishsoap/water in a spray bottle if it’s being stubborn or having trouble seating the bead. In trail scenario a bar of soap would suffice. Can also buy miniature tyre paste tubs, but when out on a multi day ride a bar of soap/dishwash would serve two purposes.

    Something that made the job more ‘enjoyable’ for me was a tyre stand and some bead breakers. Before buying the breakers on occasion I could spend just as much time breaking a stubborn bead as changing the tyre itself!

    Bead Breaker
    Tyre Stand

    There are plenty of techniques and nuances on tyre changing, and I have found when it comes time to refit the tyre it is easier to put tube into the tyre and feed the valve stem onto rim rather than to fit one side of tyre then muck around trying to fit the valve stem through the rim, if going that route a valve puller makes that part easier.

    This is more or less how I do it https://youtu.be/m3gC2__Rxi0

    #31743

    Andrew Thomson
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike: Super Tenere, Concours 14
    • Rank: 400cc Rider

    Like your tyre stand – details?

    How stable is it when you’re really leaning on things? Would it be ok for my big bikes rims too?

    I’ve been doing mine for a while and it always seems to involve sweet, swearing and occasionally blood. Road tyres are the easiest, some Adv stuff is damn tough to get on and yeah, getting the valve through on the WR’s front sucks…

    #31746

    Daniel Fisher
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike: DRZ250 DRZ400E
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Made my Unit, http://www.unit-products.com/tool_wheel/e1250.html Got mine from Webike.

    Yep it’s fairly stable. It’s got mounting holes so you can bolt to the floor or a pallet, but I need the compactness so I use as it and have no trouble with it trying to tip. What I like most about it is the comfortable height you can work on the tyre. Most motorcycle tyre changers in that price range are ones you work on while on the ground.

    #31858

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location:
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    I merged an older thread about tyre change machines into this thread so there’s a few new comments above.

    You need one of the mount/demount bars like the no-mar ones have. The guy uses one at about 3’30” in this video

    I change a few tyres so would really like one of those, or access to one.

    #31872

    Stuart Morgan
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike:
    • Rank: 80cc Rider

    I just stick a long m10/m12 bolt in my Bench Vice, then have a piece plastic pipe/spacer over it. The Wheel is slipped over it, its all then up at bench height to work on.
    2-3 simple tyre irons is all you need spoon types are best if you don’t want to tear the tyre/pinch the tubes and lots of lube (either soap/water or silicone spray) Lots of good stuff on you tube. Just put a new front tyre/tube on my F800, and converted the rear of my KTM 450 to Tubliss. Was fairly straight forward, looking forward to trying out the new tubliss set-up next week.
    Braking the bead on the old tyre can be a pain, but again lube, and just use the irons all the way round and it will go, if not a C/G ? clamp can help to pinch the tyre if you have one big enough.

    #31875

    Andrew Thomson
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike: Super Tenere, Concours 14
    • Rank: 400cc Rider

    My el-cheapo bead breaker in action. Like I said, big rear’s are a piece of cake.

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