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Home Forums Riding Where to ride Riding Overseas LRTW – LIGHTLY! Round The World…the essentials

This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Gremlin 2 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #9223

    octopusenvy
    Participant
    • Location: Te Tai Tokerau, Aotearoa
    • Bike: 2102 Husaberg FE570 Rally Australia Bike, 2007 BMW 650 x-Challenge, 2009 Buell XP Ulysses Police Duty (1 of 137)
    • Rank: 650cc Rider

    of course wallets/credit cards/phone/camera and a good book are all part of the play, just didn’t add them…

    ok added them.

    #9220

    octopusenvy
    Participant
    • Location: Te Tai Tokerau, Aotearoa
    • Bike: 2102 Husaberg FE570 Rally Australia Bike, 2007 BMW 650 x-Challenge, 2009 Buell XP Ulysses Police Duty (1 of 137)
    • Rank: 650cc Rider

    Starting this for my own good and good of others…

    Anywhere travel around the planet by motorbike needs certain basics and essentials. This is the place to add your ideas, but these are mine so far (always adding/changing). This can be for what I call LRTW, LIGHTLY Round The World, or just sections or parts of the world. The key here is L I G H T!!! Who wants to lug around heaps of crap u don’t need or lift it up each time you drop it (if u drop at all)? So the biggest acronym would be K.I.L.S., Keep It Light Stupid! Obviously the bike is a whole different discussion including specific spares, but I use the same principle within reason i.e. don’t buy a cheap light bike with cheap light parts for a major ride.

    Essential Items for LRTW touring:
    1. Ziplock 1st Aid kit
    You can take more, but its about what you NEED. Spray-on plaster is ideal (doesn’t fall off, works, lasts ages), tweezers, strapping tape, general antibiotics, antibiotic cream (better than antiseptic), butterfly sutures, iodine tablets (for water purification or wound cleaning), crepe bandage.
    2. Minor tool set
    This is its own debate, but I use a small T-socket set, 1 med crescent wrench, 1set of spanners (open one end, closed other), spare fuses, zip ties (lots), electrical tape, duct tape, tyre levers, small CRC can, assorted electrical connectors, cheap multitool.
    3. Thermal/quickdry clothing and very little
    The key is layering, which means less to pack. I could live forever with one Merino wool long sleeve top with hood, 3 thermal ss tshirts (merino or synthetic), 2 long sleeve shirts, 2 thermal long johns (one thin, one thicker), 3 thermal shorts, 4pairs of socks, and a few pairs of cheap boxers to be replaced regularly on the road. All of this might take up 10lt of space or less.
    4. Maps, nuff said
    5. Water bladder like camelback for drinking
    6. RainX small bottle, since visibility is KEY
    7. 12v compressor (small)
    8. Toiletry bag (toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, deodorant rock, hand/face lotion, comb)
    9. Quickdry large silky towel
    10. ATGATT (helmet, riding pants, hiking boots, riding jacket, gloves)
    11. Durable drinking containers (lexan bottle and hot drink mug)
    12. Rag or two and a few plastic bags (for dry socks)
    13. Pens & Notepad
    14. Small gifts for people along the way from home (small gifts go a LONG way)
    15. Cheap rain poncho and pants
    16. Headtorch (waterproof PrincetonTec Byte is my choice, red/white, 2AAA, small)
    17. Loo paper
    18. Wallet/cash/credit card
    19. Smartphone
    20. Good book!

    #9229

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location: Hamilton
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    I would scratch the good book, they don’t actually last that long, are bulky and heavy and a smartphone can carry hundreds of them with no extra weight.

    I’d also be inclined to ditch the compressor in favour of a quality handpump. With my (Thanks @jake-maryniak) double action hand pump I can pump a tyre up to 22psi or more pretty easily, and compressors can fail due to vibration etc.

    You have tyre levers but no tubes/patches, personally I’d take a combination of both.

    I’d also have a camera, though a smartphone may cover that as well.

    #9237

    octopusenvy
    Participant
    • Location: Te Tai Tokerau, Aotearoa
    • Bike: 2102 Husaberg FE570 Rally Australia Bike, 2007 BMW 650 x-Challenge, 2009 Buell XP Ulysses Police Duty (1 of 137)
    • Rank: 650cc Rider

    true the smartphone can cover the books, so ill scratch that, but something about reading a real book on the road. No need for batteries to read either. But certainly smaller. Compressor vs handpump…again possibly better, just depends on the size of compressor as i’ve seen some tiny ones and its nice to get above 22psi when u back on tarseal but no fueling station for miles. This isn’t obviously an NZ issue since we’re tiny. Tubes/tyres depends on what you are running (tubeless vs mousse), but ill add tyre repair kit. Camera is a tough one…you don’t NEED it if u have a decent smartphone, but so much better. I do bring one, a compact SONY RX100 with Zeiss lens, best prosumer point and shoot at the moment.

    Keep em comin!

    #9249

    orangeutan
    Participant
    • Location: Tauranga
    • Bike: KTM 1190
    • Rank: 50cc Rider

    Hello all, I’m a newbie to this forum. Just wanted to add (from my limited adv riding experience) if running tubeless tyres repair plugs and at least 6 gas canisters. I have used them and they work brilliantly. Also a short length of stiff 12mm alkathene or hose pipe for temp repair to broken clutch/brake lever.

    #9266

    moomin
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike:
    • Rank: 50cc Rider

    really good thread on the topic here, from Dave Lomax…

    #9267

    Gremlin
    Participant
    • Location: Auckland
    • Bike: 2010 BMW R1200GS Adventure
    • Rank: 1000cc Rider

    I stopped using canisters and have been carrying a compressor since 2011. What happens if you have a second puncture, or the first isn’t fixed properly etc. Adding air by hand when you’re going above 30 (in my case anyway) would uh… take a while.

    I prefer a proper camera, plus the right ones are water/dust/shock/freeze proof and work with gloves (unless you modify or buy certain gloves). Also, leaving the mobile on, and it’s searching for a signal shortens its life, so you might not have enough juice if you need to make a call. Turning it on and off takes too long…

    Tools, as you say, a debate in itself, but recognise your and the bikes limits. If you’re no mechanic, no point taking complex stuff. With my BMW, much more than basics going wrong and I can’t fix roadside anyway.

    I also carry a personal locator beacon. Hopefully never needed for myself, but someone else might need it too.

    If you’re travelling with someone, team up, no point everyone carrying the same stuff.

    #9268

    octopusenvy
    Participant
    • Location: Te Tai Tokerau, Aotearoa
    • Bike: 2102 Husaberg FE570 Rally Australia Bike, 2007 BMW 650 x-Challenge, 2009 Buell XP Ulysses Police Duty (1 of 137)
    • Rank: 650cc Rider

    Have to agree about the compressor. On a small bike, its tough to incorporate but easier on 750cc and up. I’ve got a couple cartridges on my Ulysses, but I might swap them to the 650 xchallenge and put my compressor into the Buell airbox…if it fits. Or just get a smaller one 🙂

    I go with a proper camera too, Gremlin, for the same reasons. I just had a good look at the Nikon N1AW, which would be a really great all weather mirrorless, WATERPROOF & INTERCHANGEABLE LENSES…if it didn’t leak underwater. I’m keen if they ever do a markII! Until then I shoot with a Sony RX100, which I’ve already dropped once 🙁

    As for the PLB, I can see that one might be useful if they’re not too dear, and I think Eddie rents them.

    #9305

    Gremlin
    Participant
    • Location: Auckland
    • Bike: 2010 BMW R1200GS Adventure
    • Rank: 1000cc Rider

    This is the micro pump I’ve been using. Gets a little warm if you’re doing a few PSI or both tyres up by 10+ each, but meh, I’m in no rush. Let it cool, pack away, continue.

    http://www.advdesigns.com/mitipukitba.html

    I’ve used a Sony DSC-TX 5 and 20, very small cameras, sliding front that auto-powers on the camera and full touch screen on rear. The 5 didn’t last long however… so I won’t endorse for robustness just yet.

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