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Home Forums General Discussion Chit Chat Take it to the track – Run what you brung drag racing

This topic contains 0 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Eddieb 2 years, 4 months ago.

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    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location: Hamilton, New Zealand
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Has anyone ever done this? I drag raced my my Suzuki RG400 at Meremere years ago and it was a pile of fun, I also did one of the Cliffhanger 1/4 Mile sprint events in the Wairarapa on my Ducati 888.

    Meremere Drag Strip runs a Winter Drag Race series which has a class for ‘Dial Your Own’ drag racing. All you need is a fully road legal motorcycle with appropriate license and be wearing proper riding gear. For motorbikes even learners can race ast long as you are on a LAMS approved bike.

    Dial your own racing

    By far the most popular form of drag racing is a handicapped form of competition known as “E.T. Bracket Racing” or “D.Y.O Racing”. In this form of racing, two vehicles of varying performance potentials can race on a potentially even basis. The anticipated elapsed times for each vehicle are compared, with the slower car receiving a head-start equal to the difference of the two. With this system, virtually any two vehicles can be paired in a competitive drag race. The catch is, you must still cross the finish line first without going faster than your posted time. If a racer goes faster than the time he or she nominates, this is an automatic loss also known as a break out. If both racers break out, then the racer who breaks out by more is deemed the loser.

    For Example: Car A has been timed a 17.78, 17.74, and 17.76 seconds for the quarter-mile, and the driver feels that a “dial-in” of 17.75 is appropriate. Meanwhile, the driver of car B has recorded elapsed times of 15.27, 15.22 and 15.26 on the same track and he has opted for a “dial-in” of 15.25. Accordingly, car A will get a 2.5-second head-start over car B when the “Christmas Tree” counts down to each car’s starting green lights.

    If both vehicles cover the quarter-mile in exactly the predetermined elapsed time, the win will go to the driver who reacts quickest to the starting signal. That reaction to the starting signal is called “reaction time.” Both lanes are timed independently of one another, and the clock does not start until the vehicle actually moves. Because of this, a vehicle may sometimes appear to have a mathematical advantage in comparative elapsed times but actually lose the race. This fact makes starting line reflexes extremely important in drag racing!

    More info at: http://www.framautolitedragway.co.nz/events/C10_Drag_Wars.html

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