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Home Forums Bikes Ducati The original Ducati Scrambler

This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Team Buffoon 1 month, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #9825

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location:
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider
    #12693

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location:
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    The Scrambler above is actually a widecase model made after 1968, the original Scrambler used the narrowcase frame of 1962 – late 1967.

    Here’s a custom rebuild of an original narrow case Ducati Scrambler, check it out @airborne_arms_co

    Look Again: Bryan Fuller’s Ducati 250 Scrambler

    The first bike was based on a 60s-model, bevel-driven Ducati 250 Scrambler. Bryan picked it up at the Barber Vintage Festival, and hauled the engine off to Rich Lambrechts at DesmoPro to rebuild. And as it turned out, Rich had enough parts in the shop to build a second, identical Scrambler—so the Super Duc was born.

    The two chassis are the same too, right down to the center-mount twin rear shock arrangements. The tail sections are new, and the swingarms extended by two inches. That meant also fabricating a custom chain guide and tensioner arrangement.

    Both engines were meticulously rebuilt, right down to the very last detail. Upgrades included electronic ignitions and 12V conversions, Speedcell Lithium-ion batteries, K&N filters and ARP stainless steel fasteners.

    Up front are vintage Ceriani forks. The wheels are Borrani shouldered rims, laced to stock hubs with Buchanan’s stainless steel spokes. They’re wrapped in Pirelli MT 21 RallyCross tires.

    The exhausts for both bikes are custom: hand-made headers with Cone Engineering mufflers. Rounding out the package are bits like a Super Pratic throttle, repro Ducati grips, KTM foot pegs, and LED lighting.

    When it came to the bodywork, Bryan hand-shaped a pair of identical headlight shrouds and tailpieces. But the project stalled when he couldn’t find a suitable tank for the Super Duc.

    “This turned out to be harder than we thought—most folks I asked didn’t know. Two years went by, and finally Beno Rodi struck pay dirt. At Davenport, I believe, he found a NOS 1974 Penton tank that was a perfect match… and not a single dent.”

    On went the Penton tank, along with a set of stainless steel fenders. But with Super Duc almost ready to hit the dirt, Bryan changed his mind about keeping it.

    “Reality set in,” he says. “Handing people an expensive, right-side shift motorcycle to thrash wasn’t the smartest idea. So we decided to sell it for someone to own and enjoy.”

    Decent upholstery and a tidy paint job were in order.

    John Whitaker covered the seat with perforated black leather, while Bryan and Chastin Brand tackled the paint.

    “We wanted the bike to appeal to Ducati owners, so we stuck to the Italian red, white, and black theme. Chastin’s pinstripes were inspired by the stripes on the Kiwi brand helmet I’m wearing in this shoot.”

    Bryan loves his own 250 Scrambler, even though it’s rough around the edges. “It’s one of the few bikes I refuse to sell.”

    With the same genes but a little more polish, looks like the lucky new owner of Super Duc will get just as much joy.

    #12889

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location:
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Not scramblers but Ducati made forays into the off road scene with other models also.

    There were only 15-20 Ducati MX’s made in 175 and 200cc engine capacities.

    The Ducati Utah was a one-off concept using half a Pantah motor that never made it into production due to internal political issues in Ducati at the time. Only 1 Utah was ever made.
    More about the Utah: http://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-italian-motorcycles/classic-ducati-motorcycles/ducati-utah-prototype-zmmz16mazhur.aspx

    #26470

    Team Buffoon
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike:
    • Rank: 125cc Rider

    My 1966 250 SCR. Bit of work still to do. Hope to make some progress this winter.

    Attachments:
    #29770

    Team Buffoon
    Participant
    • Location:
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    • Rank: 125cc Rider

    So not done much on the poor old 250SCR recently, too much sailing been going on. Time to make some progress so dragged her out from under the bench at the weekend. Going to get a new rear wheel made up as the rim is a chromed 18″ steel number that has seen better days. Going to go with a 19″ to match the front as that is what it would have had originally. I know I am getting ahead of myself a bit but thinking about tyres. Sizes probably 325×19 front and 350×19 rear. Bike will spend most of its time on seal but I do want it to be able to handle gravel roads OK. Wanted to try to keep the original look with some old school looking Trials Tyres, found the Heidenau K67 which looks spot on but I am hearing that they are not very good on the road and are very stiff. The Dunlop K70 is a vintage looking tyre which also picks up good reviews for gravel riding, just not so chunky looking.
    Anyone have any NZ experience of K70s in gravel or any ideas for a classic trials tyre that looks like the K67 but which will work well on the road?

    #29772

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location:
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Well lots of sailing means you are employed, which means more money for bits for the bikes.

    Can you get rears in 19″ size? I’ve never looked.

    I am in the UK at the moment and just missed out on a Mototrans 250 a few weeks ago for about $3500NZD that had all the tinware my bike needed. Had I got it once the tinware had been removed it would have become a scrambler of some sort.

    #29773

    Team Buffoon
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike:
    • Rank: 125cc Rider

    Ah not that sort of sailing, this is the sort that includes sails and spending lots of money rather than making money! Shore based job now.

    Dunlop K70 do the right sizes and I don’t think they are fussy if they are front or rear so think that is where I will end up.

    Sent you a link to a tank I saw on ebay last week Eddie, it was a Hotmail address so not sure if that is still in use. Also I was looking for those photos you sent of your frame where the footpegs attach, as mine had been cut off. Might have to ask you to send again if I cannot find them!

    Enjoy UK, have a beer or two for me.

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