‘Farkling’ (Functionally Accessorising) your adventure bike

Adventure riding, by it’s nature, can take you places where the terrain is rough and there is a possibility of falling off and damaging your adventure bike. In the worst case this could leave you stranded somewhere. To offset this risk there are a number of accessories available to increase your riding comfort and control, protect your bike in case of falling off and give you a greater piece of mind to enjoy your riding.

Bash Plate

A bash plate mounts to the underside of the bike to and protects the engine from  stones thrown up from the front wheel or from grounding the engine on rocks. A bashplate should be placed high on the list of potential upgrades to your adventure bike.

Lever guards

Lever guards attach to the outer ends of the handlebars and curve around the brake and clutch levers to attach near the centre of the handlebars, they provide a degree of protection for your lever controls in the event of falling off. Being stuck down a track or back road with no front brakes or clutch is not much fun and could mean a long push or call to a recovery service to get you home.

Crash Bars

Crash bars mount to each side of your adventure bike, again to provide protection in event of an accident. Crash bars generally tend to offer protection of the bodywork of an adventure bike more than mechanical protection.

Extra fuel capacity

 Many smaller adventure bikes are fitted with small petrol tanks as standard, often in the range of 9-12 litres. This can mean a range of less than 200km’s between fuel stops and can severely limit your ability to explore back roads and tracks. Again at worst leave you stranded somewhere if fuel economy is lower than expected and you run out.

There are a number of options for carrying extra fuel ranging from inflatable fuel bladders and plastic tanks to strap to your rear seat through to larger model specific fuel tanks to replace or supplement the factory fitted petrol tank.

Luggage

Whether you are heading away for a day trip or an extended journey, some way of carrying luggage from as little as a camera and a snack, through to your entire life is handy.

Luggage options range from tank bags that sit on the petrol tank and tail bags for the rear seat through to larger side mounted soft panniers and plastic or alloy boxes.  Motorcycle manufacturers often offer factory luggage options for their larger adventure models and there are many after-market manufacturers offering model specific and generic luggage solutions.

Bar risers

Bar risers raise the height of the handle bars and can offer a much more comfortable and controllable riding position when seated or standing, especially for taller riders. Bar risers are often available in different heights, before purchasing a set of bar risers check that your clutch, brake, accelerator cables and wiring have enough slack to accommodate a longer distance to the handlebars.

Larger footpegs

Larger footpegs can provide a more stable foot platform when standing or riding on rougher terrain, which in turn gives better control and more confidence.

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  camilla 1 year, 5 months ago.

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  • #10741

    Eddieb
    Keymaster
    • Location: Hamilton
    • Bike: Suzuki DR650 ADV
    • Rank: 1200cc Rider

    Adventure riding, by it’s nature, can take you places where the terrain is rough and there is a possibility of falling off and damaging your adventure
    [See the full post at: ‘Farkling’ (Functionally Accessorising) your adventure bike]

    #11629

    camilla
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike:
    • Rank: 80cc Rider

    Does anyone have strong ideas on what is good/not good when it comes to luggage? What do members like about their own luggage options? I need to start from scratch and set up all new bags for my XT250

    #13174

    octopusenvy
    Participant
    • Location: Te Tai Tokerau, Aotearoa
    • Bike: 2102 Husaberg FE570 Rally Australia Bike, 2007 BMW 650 x-Challenge, 2009 Buell XP Ulysses Police Duty (1 of 137)
    • Rank: 650cc Rider

    <cite>@camilla said:</cite>
    Does anyone have strong ideas on what is good/not good when it comes to luggage? What do members like about their own luggage options? I need to start from scratch and set up all new bags for my XT250

    Kia ora Camilla, not sure what you ended up with doing but FWIW…

    Soft luggage is the preference here in NZ. I’d only go to hard luggage if you were paranoid about your things getting pinched. Otherwise hard cases can be dangerous in a fall. They both protect the bike a bit if you tip over anywhere, but soft luggage is lighter, easier to carry, and looks better too IMHO.

    I recently got an excellent set of soft, waterproof, drybag style luggage called MOTO-SAC. Sure you can buy Giant Loop, but the GL bags are expensive and not waterproof. You can find it on ebay.com.au and I’m really happy with it. 3x 10lt bags, fully waterproof, that attach to a horseshoe style carrier. You can remove the bags or remove the entire horseshoe, run with one, two, or three bags, and each bag comes with carry straps if you want to make it into a daybag off the bike. Very well built and reasonable price. I paid around 300nzd and ordered from Western Australia.

    Moto-Sac

    #13181

    camilla
    Participant
    • Location:
    • Bike:
    • Rank: 80cc Rider

    Thanks, I did get a Third Gear soft bag, cheap as chips and perfect for the shorter adventures eg Queens birthday weekend. It isn’t waterproof, the stitching might need reinforcing but for $75 it got me something and I can put dribags into it. It has attachments so I can put more bags, or tent on top.
    I appreciate your feedback though. Cheers!

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